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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I preface this by saying that I've had a 2012 and 2016 Cayenne. I took possession of my 2022 Cayenne E-hybrid Coupe in January 2022 and took my time breaking in the engine for over 2,000 miles. Now that I've driven it for a few months with a mix of gas and electric (total 4,800 miles) I must share my latest stats. This was calculated in the Porsche Connect App (screen shot below):

Since refueling the Cayenne 3 weeks ago, these are the stats:
1. Driven a total of 608 miles over 24 hours.
2. 308 of the 608 miles were a mix of i) all electric (driving locally shopping, errands etc) and ii) hybrid mode in 2 longer trips of over 90 miles each.
3. The mixed driving yielded 48 MPG (as advertised, I believe)
4. The best part is that I still have a little less than a half tank of gas left (215 miles: car's estimate for the range of remaining fuel)
5. 2.7 mi/kWh average is quite good, Most of my trips were >3 mi/kWh - but this is summer, so it's what would be expected.

This is beyond my expectations for a car that also performs in both acceleration and handling (air suspension and 4-wheel steering). Of course, if you don't have a similar mix of local and highway, the numbers will differ accordingly - but if you have such a mix, hybrids are the way to go, and this one is amazing all around.

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Wow, this looks really good. Question: How much range do you have for the great eMPG between charging? What I mean is, if I go on a 700 mile trip in one day, does the battery recharge itself enough to keep the combined / average consumption in the 40's?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, it depends on the type of driving you do on the trip. In hybrid mode, if it's all highway and you don't use the battery very much, you will get about 30 mpg on nearly all ICE driving (in hybrid, the engine will shut off when coasting downhill, but it is seamless). In my longer 200 mile trips, with both traffic and highway I get ~35 MPG. In the example I used, i did a lot of battery driving during that time. It's the mix of traffic and highway that gives you the advantage. If the battery is completely depleted because you have been in a lot of traffic, then you get on the highway, the car will charge the battery enough to maintain performance. If the battery is low and you're on a trip, you also have a setting to charge the battery while driving, so you have a lot of charge when you arrive at your destination. Also, if you opt for the Innodrive option, and you plot a trip, the car will anticipate traffic and urban driving in the trip and save the battery use for those locations. The battery is not large and gives you a total of about 25-30 miles. Hybrids are for those of us who have mostly mixed driving, that's when it shines. You always have the option to put it into Sport or Sport+ and it's a regular Porsche. if you plan to do that often, get the Chrono package so the dial is on the steering wheel.
 

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Super helpful, thank you. I have an allocation for a 2023 July build, so locking in soon. I got the chrono already configured. My long trips are all highway and have several mountain passes, so I'm thinking the battery will recharge on the downhill. 35 mpg mixed is pretty darn good, materially better than the 25 I get in my diesel range rover. And the mixed driving mpg, which is most of the time, is superb. Thanks again.
 

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I'm following this as one who is interested in possibly buying a Cayenne E-Hybrid, but am planning to wait for the expanded battery pack that will yield 80 km = 50 miles of all-electric range (presumably MY2024), as announced by Porsche CEO Oliver Blume recently (annual March press conference). Even Porsche owners (I bought a new 2018 Panamera 4 E-Hybrid) like to drive in all-electric mode as much as possible locally -- when you're driving a low speeds. While the mixture of electric-motor and ICE power/torque is nice, I think that the real attraction to PHEVs (aside from lower gasoline costs and government rebates/tax credits) is the ability to drive in all-electric at speeds < 45 mph most or all of the time. ICEs are just plain inferior for driving at < 45 mph, and electric motors are vastly superior when driving < 45 mph. Where ICEs shine and are most useful are at speeds > 45 mph (and that's also where electric motors/batteries are much inferior in terms of efficiency and range).

So I'm eager to hear, with the current ca. 18-kWh battery pack, how far a 2022 Cayenne E-Hybrid can actually go on electric-only driving at speeds < 45 mph (which is what many people do in their daily local driving). Once you get up to 60 or 70 or 80 mph, the traction battery will drain much more rapidly due to the laws of physics (air resistance), and experienced PHEV owners know that you change to Hybrid mode when you drive > 45 mph, while keeping it in E-Power (Porsche's all-electric mode for PHEVs) for speeds < 45 mph. So, when talking about all-electric range, it's imperative to give the speeds driven in E-Power mode. No way will you get 25-30 miles of all-electric range in a 2022 E-Hybrid when driving at 75-80 mph; you'll be lucky to get 15 miles at such speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Cometguy, you're correct, it would be nice to have a larger battery if you're looking to use E-power mostly. In my experience with the 2022 18-kWh battery pack fully charged, the car calculates the range to be between 22-35 miles, depending its previous milage and driving habits (See below). But in actuality on E-power, driving locally (20-40 mph, no faster than ~55 mph on occasions) I get about 20-22 miles of range. Certainly, at higher speeds you will get much less, that's why you would use hybrid mode for that, where e-mode would kick-in during traffic. In the example below, I just fill up both battery and tank.


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