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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can we talk about how there is barely anything out there for the 958.2 GTS? I have been searching for intakes, exhaust systems and any other parts to lighten, increase hp, and torque with very little luck.

// I would like to get this thread going to specifically list known performance upgrades and sources to buy upgrades for the 2017 Cayenne GTS (3.6L V6). Please verify that you have confirmed each part works with said vehicle. \\


INSTRUCTIONS - Copy the last post and add the correct number to your part and post. Repeat process.


/// 2017 3.6L V6 GTS Performance Parts List \\\


1. K&N Air Filters
HP Gain Claim 10-25 HP (supposedly)
Quantity Needed: You need to buy 2 for this engine, one on each side since it is twin turbo.
Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/3plErfK
Install Video:

2. Fabspeed Catback Straight Pipes - Porsche 958.2 S / GTS 2nd link Pipes (2015-2018)
HP Gain Claim: 5-10
Purchase Link: Fabspeed Porsche 958.2 S / GTS 2nd link Pipes (2015-2018)
Video:

3. ?
 

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Shorten that list if you live in CA... cannot delete the secondary cats. No CEL, but won't pass emissions if they do a visual inspection.
 
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I'd shorten it even more. K&N filters? Claims of increased HP are dubious at best. Filtering quality is less than the stock papers ones (which are MUCH bigger than they have to be - and with a turbo engine basically unneeded.)

It's very difficult to improve on perfection. You can spend a lot of money putting performance "mods" on your car, but you'll find that Porsche doesn't leave performance sitting on the table for some guys in a garage to pickup and sell. The biggest effect of most performance products is to lighten the car by significantly lightening your wallet.

One performance mod that works is a performance driving school/experience. Porsche offers them, and most local PCA chapters in the US offer them. You might be really surprised at what the stock car can do. Of course, that won't impress the cars and coffee Asian performance car enthusiasts, but that's never been a goal of mine anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
INSTRUCTIONS - Copy the last post and add the correct number to your part and post. Repeat process.


/// 2017 3.6L V6 GTS Performance Parts List \\\


1. K&N Air Filters
HP Gain Claim: 10-25 HP (supposedly)
Quantity Needed: You need to buy 2 for this engine, one on each side since it is twin turbo.
Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/3plErfK
Install Video:


2. Fabspeed Secondary Cat Pipes - Porsche 958.2 S / GTS 2nd link Pipes (2015-2018)
HP Gain Claim: 5-10
Purchase Link: Fabspeed Porsche 958.2 S / GTS 2nd link Pipes (2015-2018)
Video:


3. Racechip - RaceChip GTS Black
HP Gain Claim: +70 HP1
Torque Gain Claim: +130 lb-ft1
Purchase Link: VR Tuned ECU Flash Tune Porsche Cayenne 958 S | GTS 3.6L Turbo | VRT-958-36GTS


4. Racechip XLR (Throttle Controller)
HP Gain: More of it faster
Torque Gain Claim: More of it at a lower RPM
Purchase Link: Performance chips – Chip tuning by RaceChip for Porsche Cayenne (92A) 3.6 GTS (324KW) | RaceChip
Video:
Notes: By far the best addition for the price. Gives you immediate torque all up front. You WILL notice a huge difference off the start.

5. Vivid Racing ECU Bench Flash
HP Gain - Stage 1: +20
Torque Gain - Stage 1: +36 lb-ft
Stage 2 - Should have upgraded air filters, cat pipes, diverter valves and perhaps exhaust for stage 2.
HP Gain - Stage 2: +40
Torque Gain - Stage 2: +52 lb-ft
Purchase Link: VR Tuned ECU Flash Tune Porsche Cayenne 958 S | GTS 3.6L Turbo | VRT-958-36GTS
Video Link:


6. Vivid Racing Diverter Valves
Helps balance and maintain boost levels and stock diverters are prone to leaking and possibly breaking.
Video:
Purchase Link: VR Performance Upgraded Diverter Valve Black Volkswagen | Audi 1.8T 2.0T Models | VR-UNI-150
 

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A couple others not mentioned above, but off the top of the head: TECHART, SoulPP..

If not already, recommend establishing yourself with a good, local indy shop that specializes in Porsche - often immensely valuable.

Air filters. 3rd party air filters (from the major performance brands) will enable a greater volume of air to pass, which might -not guaranteed- provide more performance. What's key to understand is that to enable a greater volume of airflow - you're either allowing larger particulates to pass or you're going to be doing more (a lot more) air filter maintenance. If larger particles, you run the risk of sucking something into the engine that the manufacturer had not accounted for. Having had various brands of air filters on numerous vehicles, the most notable was K&N on sport bikes. Significant improvement compared to a new factory air filter - on four-wheeled vehicles, not so much. You may find yourself pulling the air filters every couple of months to clean/re-oil and re-install in order to maintain optimal performance. Pollen season and driving through areas with more ambient dust/debris can result in almost monthly cleanings. Try driving the beach on a windy day with a filter that uses a 'tack' coating of oil and see how well that works out (they seem to be a "magnet" for sand particles so that by the time you're back on pavement - you've created an expensive air restriction to ensure that a factory vehicle outruns you, with ease). Otherwise, just change the filters every 3-6 months and call it a day.

Tuning. Porsche does leave "some" performance on the table (excluding exotic engine rebuilds). Recommend doing some careful research into any given tune. Experience has been that tuning where the ambient curve is increased throughout the range will yield far greater drive-ability and you'll enjoy the vehicle magnitudes more. Changes that reduce the necessary pedal "travel" to reach full throttle, make regular driving abysmal - especially in bad weather. it will also inhibit minute throttle adjustment(s) that aid in the pleasure of carving up windy roads. Massive increases within a short band in the upper RPM range [generally] are far more likely to exacerbate failure. (its the logical difference between giving it the spurs at 30MPH vs. from a dead stop - one of those has a demonstrably greater chance of breaking something).

The sheer volume of "mods" for American muscle cars or Asian performance vehicles would notionally be much greater - as they are built to a much lower price point and there are many more of them on the street. One should be mindful that, that same 5+ year old Cayenne [958.2/E2] but in the "Turbo" variant (despite the Cayenne's sheer mass) still outruns >~90% of all vehicles on the street. While not as vast, there is still a selection of mods that can be had for any Porsche (including the 958.2 GTS). Generally, you will find noticeably more mods available as you climb the ladder - particularly the "Turbo" variant. As purchasers who's primary interest is sheer performance are generally going to purchase the Turbo variant and then ardently pursue increases on that platform (with cost consideration being quite a few rungs down on the ladder of importance, if at all). Another significant change (as noted in an earlier response) is weight reduction via logarithmic ratio offset between resultant vehicle weight and monetary storage medium.
 

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A couple others not mentioned above, but off the top of the head: TECHART, SoulPP..

If not already, recommend establishing yourself with a good, local indy shop that specializes in Porsche - often immensely valuable.

Air filters. 3rd party air filters (from the major performance brands) will enable a greater volume of air to pass, which might -not guaranteed- provide more performance. What's key to understand is that to enable a greater volume of airflow - you're either allowing larger particulates to pass or you're going to be doing more (a lot more) air filter maintenance. If larger particles, you run the risk of sucking something into the engine that the manufacturer had not accounted for. Having had various brands of air filters on numerous vehicles, the most notable was K&N on sport bikes. Significant improvement compared to a new factory air filter - on four-wheeled vehicles, not so much. You may find yourself pulling the air filters every couple of months to clean/re-oil and re-install in order to maintain optimal performance. Pollen season and driving through areas with more ambient dust/debris can result in almost monthly cleanings. Try driving the beach on a windy day with a filter that uses a 'tack' coating of oil and see how well that works out (they seem to be a "magnet" for sand particles so that by the time you're back on pavement - you've created an expensive air restriction to ensure that a factory vehicle outruns you, with ease). Otherwise, just change the filters every 3-6 months and call it a day.

Tuning. Porsche does leave "some" performance on the table (excluding exotic engine rebuilds). Recommend doing some careful research into any given tune. Experience has been that tuning where the ambient curve is increased throughout the range will yield far greater drive-ability and you'll enjoy the vehicle magnitudes more. Changes that reduce the necessary pedal "travel" to reach full throttle, make regular driving abysmal - especially in bad weather. it will also inhibit minute throttle adjustment(s) that aid in the pleasure of carving up windy roads. Massive increases within a short band in the upper RPM range [generally] are far more likely to exacerbate failure. (its the logical difference between giving it the spurs at 30MPH vs. from a dead stop - one of those has a demonstrably greater chance of breaking something).

The sheer volume of "mods" for American muscle cars or Asian performance vehicles would notionally be much greater - as they are built to a much lower price point and there are many more of them on the street. One should be mindful that, that same 5+ year old Cayenne [958.2/E2] but in the "Turbo" variant (despite the Cayenne's sheer mass) still outruns >~90% of all vehicles on the street. While not as vast, there is still a selection of mods that can be had for any Porsche (including the 958.2 GTS). Generally, you will find noticeably more mods available as you climb the ladder - particularly the "Turbo" variant. As purchasers who's primary interest is sheer performance are generally going to purchase the Turbo variant and then ardently pursue increases on that platform (with cost consideration being quite a few rungs down on the ladder of importance, if at all). Another significant change (as noted in an earlier response) is weight reduction via logarithmic ratio offset between resultant vehicle weight and monetary storage medium.
Very thoughtful and appreciated
 
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